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Soldier Missing from Korean War Identified

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In July 1951, the U.S. Army Graves Registration recovered the remains of four men north of Shaha-dong, near Seoul, South Korea.  The remains were buried in the United Nation Cemetery at Tanggok, South Korea, and were disinterred and transferred to the U.S. Army's Central Identification Unit in Kokura, Japan for laboratory analysis.

During the analysis the remains of three men could not be positively identified. In March 1955, a military review board declared the remains of the fourth to be unidentifiable.  The unidentified remains were transferred to Hawaii, where they were interred as "unknown" at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, also known as the "Punchbowl."

In 2012, U.S. officials reevaluated Fisher's records and determined that with advances in technology, the unknown remains could likely be identified.  Following the reevaluation, the decision was made to exhume the remains for scientific analysis identification.

In the identification of the remains, scientists from the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command (JPAC) used circumstantial evidence and forensic identification tools, such as dental comparison and chest radiograph ? which matched Fisher's records.

Using modern technology, identifications continue to be made from remains that were previously turned over by North Korean officials.  Today, more than 7,900 Americans remain unaccounted for from the Korean War.

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account for missing Americans, visit the DPMO web site at http://www.dtic.mil/dpmo or call 703-699-1420.

Soldier Missing from Korean War Identified [ http://www.defense.gov/releases/release.aspx?releaseid=16159 ] 07/18/2013 03:32 PM CDT